Child death review: learning the lessons, differently

Each year in the UK around 260 children die or are seriously harmed and £5 million is spent “learning the lessons”. The same “lessons” have been emerging since the first UK child death inquiry in 1945 without noticeable impact on child fatalities.

Child Death Review (CDR) processes in the UK have evolved almost exclusively from social work. The Scottish Universities Insight Institute are hosting a knowledge transfer event headed by Alyson Leslie, Linda Walker and Professor Sue Black from the University of Dundee. The aim is to think about child death review processes differently, bringing together expertise from the fields of forensic investigation, psychology, education, design, statistics, policing, law, social work and health.

Next week  I’ll be responsible for design facilitation at the first of four CDR events over the coming months at the Lighthouse in Glasgow. Recent Master of Design graduates Sara Nevay and Angela Tulloch will be working with me to enable participants to use  design techniques to quickly understand the roles of the forty national and international co-participants, mapping their relationship to the child at the centre of the Child Death Review and exploring the information that they collect pertaining to the life and death of a child.

Hazel White, Course Director, Master of Design for Services

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